ARTICLES

“The first priority of any training program must be to minimize injury potential for the athlete.  That means starting where the athlete should to start and progressing—carefully, systematically—from that point forward.  First, you train to learn.  Then you train to train.  Then you train to compete; and finally, you train to win.  Overmatching bodies with training demands those bodies are not prepared for is a recipe for injury.  Competition can be dangerous.  Bodies need to be adaptable, not simply adapted.  After all:  We want to create champions . . . not perpetual patients.”  Steve Myrland

 
Why Athletes Should Avoid The Bars (An intemperate look at barbell-centric training)

Perhaps the most persistent blunder athletes and coaches make in training to compete is regularly mistaking “strength” for “athleticism,” so let’s clear this up right away:  Athleticism—the ability to express one’s physical self with optimal speed, agility, strength, balance, suppleness, stamina and grace while avoiding injury—is the goal.  Strength, as you will note by re-reading the sentence, above, is a single element of the collective term:  athleticism.  You cannot be athletic without being strong; but you can be strong without being athletic.

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NATURE, NUTURE & KNEES

Steve Myrland

Much has been said and written about the epidemic of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears in female athletes. The New York Times has offered several articles relating to this topic in the past year. Link to  NYTimes The Uneven Playing Field and NYTimes New Leaps in Research on Injuries. Initially, explanations for the disparity in the number of these injuries in males and females often centered on a few aspects of female-specific physiology.

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ATHLETIC BALANCE (AND PERSPECTIVE)

Steve Myrland

If you have ever spent an extended period of time aboard a sailboat, you will have firsthand knowledge of an interesting and telling phenomenon: When, after many hours on the water, you disembark and set your feet on terra-firma once more, you find your inner gyroscope is now a bit . . . off . . . when it comes to standing on something that does not move. Your central nervous system has, in fact, adjusted (beautifully!) to a world in constant (and often unpredictable) motion. You will experience much the same thing if you spend time running on a treadmill. Once you switch the machine off, you face some moments of awkward re-adjustment to a (relatively) stable world.

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OBSTACLES TO EXCELLENCE

Steve Myrland / Vern Gambetta

We do not coach in a vacuum. At the same time we are striving for athletic excellence, we are (always) contending with obstacles resulting from our contemporary (and changing) social order. And while advances in technology may cause the stock market to move, they, generally, have the opposite effect on people.

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Guru-ism And The Decline Of Coaching

Steve Myrland

Marshall McLuhan got it right, commenting on our collective gullibility. Truth is a relative ommodity. For example: the woman next door suggests to you over the fence one day hat we all ought to learn to live in peace. You nod, edge away and head back inside ondering how you managed to get saddled with such an oddball for a neighbor. But of ourse: If she has a Nobel Prize . . . you will be quoting her at every opportunity. “And did I mention we’re neighbors?” you will add with pride.

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A confident, young,Train To Play athlete.

 

ABC Agility Ladder footwork drills